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to the united states. >> unless he makes it clear that he's behind kerry, they won't take kerry seriously. >> rose: why is that hard to do? >> because i think, because the president, we'll see but i think the president has basically decided the middle east is a place he wants to turn his back on. he wants to focus on the greener pastures of asia. >> i would say if i may that the risk is not just domestic, it's global. because of the linkage, if you fail in the middle east it resonates in north korea and vice versa. so the risk is broader than just the domestic price to be paid. >> rose: we continue this evening with a look at the frontier of medicine and how information, data is being used to understand illness and to provide us with an early warning. we talk with jeffrey hammerbacher, he is chief scientist at cloudera. >> and we went through a period in which data generation seemed to grow exponentially and that lead to the requirement to build software that could then collect and analyze that data. so if you look at the world wide web, all of a sudden we were taking all the documents, a
of state kerry returns to the region in a short while to pursue the work, these differences will surface. they were not-- they came out unilaterally by the president in the speech but they will come up fully when secretary kerry returns to the region. >> rose: but how did barack obama come to the presidency with what attitudes did israel, what commitments, what sense of significance for him? >> i think you have two book ends to this story. the cairo speech of 2009 and the injuries lem speech of 2013. and he comes to the cairo speech, which was a speech to the arab and muslim world, the belief that bush had ruined america's reputation in the arab and muslim world. and that he needed to fix that. after all, we had 150,000 troops deployed in afghanistan and iraq. he was about to send more. we needed to improve our relations with the arabs and the muslims. and if we could achieve that, i think he felt that would redound to the benefit of israel because then the arabs would be prepared to engage with israel in response to our influence on them, and israel would then respond. that was essentia
between the israelis and palestinians can be restarted. with the new secretary of state john kerry along on this trip, some in the administration hope a new spirit of collaboration can be established. there's also a new coalition government in israel, one that remains fractured when it comes to the establishment of a palestinian state. it is no secret that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and president barack obama have not always seen eye-to-eye on the best road to peace and that's just the beginning for president obama on this historic trip. he has to deal with nuclear threats from iran and provide a road map for how far the united states will go in defense of israel. we will get insights to all of these challenges for president obama with the former ambassador to israel, martin indyk who joins us from washington where he is the vice president and director for foreign policy at the brookings institution. ambassador indyk, good to have you back on the program, sir. >> thanks, tavis, good to be with you. tavis: i gues
think the fact that his new secretary of state, john kerry, is very interested in doing exactly that at least leave that possibility open, and i think what will be much more interesting is not what happens while he is there on the ground but what happens after he leaves when senator kerry goes back and in the discussions he has with israelis and palestinians over the next several weeks. then we will know more over if there is a chance for a meaningful peace process. >> looking at the entire region, what is the significance of this? >> as i said before, his primary mission is to talk directly to the israeli public and reassure them that the united states stands behind israel at this particular moment of uncertainty, and heightened anxiety by the israeli public, and the primary focus in that regard is iran, the fear of iran gaining nuclear capability, and the spillover effect of the syrian conflict, and what that might mean for israeli security as well as long-term diplomatic efforts. to the extent that he has a message on the region, it is probably less about peace with palestini
of state kerry who will be remaining in the region. >> secretary of state john kerry was critical at this administration's lack of peace making. now that he's secretary of state does this auger well of new posture of diplomacy aimed toward creating peace in this volatile region. >> it would. it would be fortuitous. he was not president obama's first choice. that's not the strategy here. the strategy is focused on 2014 to get a domestic agenda done. if secretary kerry can make nice noises in the region, that's fine. >> you're kind of cynical. you think this is all smoke and mirrors. >> i was in it on both sides in the first clinton administration when there was a lot of fanfare in 1993, dialogue and direct negotiations would take off. they didn't until after clinton, after he was re-elected in the mid-terms in 1998, didn't take off until then. same thing in the george w. bush administration i was also a professional middle east advisor there. i just think it's not going to happen. there was no discussion here about halting settlements critical. you can say they're critical, make me
kerry, the israelis, mahmoud abbas, are going to try to operate. but as barack obama knows, no president ever lost money betting against this issue and he may not, either. >> and then there's iran, to say nothing of complicated problems. it's very clear from the president's signals in recent days and his interview with israeli television, there's a different notion in the united states. we saw this in the threat assessment testimony last week from the intelligence community. the intelligence community here believes that there's a year at least a year before iran is closing that window of vulnerability. the danger point, the red zone. israel has a very different sense of where the red doan starts and when. >> i think when you look at what the president said, he said a year from iran making a decision to pursue, to break out, they could have a bomb. that's a complicated process that involves enrichment, weaponization, a number of processes to get them to a place where they could deliver a nuclear payload. the u.s. and israel have the exact same sets of data about iran's nuclear program. ar
would argue that's one of the many reasons that we're stuck. >> rose: okay. john kerry is the new secretary of state. cares about the middle east? interested. has been as chairman of the foreign relations committee. has many contacts in the region, many trips in the region, its unlikely he would appoint an envoy. he wants to do it himself i would assume. does that make a difference? >> it seems to be the case. it's the secretary of state, he has a certain gravitas. but ultimately you're going to have to have a president who is committed to this issue and i'm not convinced that president obama see this is other as a loser issue for him at this point. >> rose: so finally, aaron, when they come back you don't think we'll have a greater understanding between the two leaders? >> i think you will. and particularly i think on iran. i think netanyahu will continue to give the president the time and space he needs on the israeli/palestinian thing. i don't know, charlie. i really think that this is a tough one and with all due respect to secretary kerry, i wish him well but barack obama is
, that is the official stance of the palestinians, united states and united nations. we understand john kerry's push will take place over the next six months to bring the israelis and palestinians together. it is critical. >> the shear number of settlements, how might that affect the prospect after two-state solution? >> well, going back to -- >> sorry -- >> the relationship for a second here, i think when we look at obama's visit here, like a few years ago, people were talking about leading from behind when it came to obama, in the middle east. and i think what we have seen come to pass. is only one of those words coming true and it wasn't -- it isn't leading. there has been just tremendous frustration as on both sides as martin mentions. palestinians are as frustrated with obama's presidency as israelis have been. so i think that is really something that he has to tackle first. and on the beast today, on the daily beast, the brookings institute has a really interesting primer on what obama should look for here at this meeting and some of the objectives he should go for. one of them is that he shou
's going to take actions. >> well john kerry is going to follow up, the secretary of state, coming back here for din wer prime minister netanyahu. as a former two-term chief white house correspondent, david, you must have been identifying with our own chuck todd and how he tried to sneak in several questions. i wanted to play a little bit more of that wonderful exchange at the news conference last night. >> thank you, mr. president. mr. prime minister. mr. president, i want to follow up a little bit on the peace process. and mr. prime minister, i want to help out my colleague over here and then a question, another question i had for you. is why do you -- >> chuck, how many you got? you see how the young lady from channel 1, she had one question, she was very well behaved, chuck. >> i got one for you. >> these are muted questions. >> i get four questions. >> this is not a kosher question, but don't hog it. >> chuck, mine you're just incorrigible. >> so, so david, of course with the four questions, the centerpiece of the passover seder, there was a seder joke, a kosher joke, it was a bors
secret about where they must lead. two states for two peoples. >> secretary of state kerry staying behind to work toward finally getting the two sides back to the table. he circles back to jerusalem from amman, jordan, saturday night. remember there haven't been substantial direct talks in more than four years. they tried briefly in 2010 but talks broke down over settlements. let's get right to chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell in jerusalem. we heard the president say israel's youth can only prosper alongside a prosperous palestine. and he said it should only be addressed after the core issues are settled. that seem like a major revision from what he said in cairo. >> reporter: it certainly is. he said settlement there's fall into question after we deal with statehood sovereignty for the palestinians and boreders in security as well for israel. this is a change. it is asking the palestinians not to demand as a, sort of a first issue before they go back to talk to have that freeze on settle manies and it is an acknowledgement that the policy in 2009 did not work. he was r
we hear from this administration is that the new secretary of state john kerry will be staying behind, will circle back to jerusalem on saturday night, meet with netanyahu and his people and try to reinvigorate it. so there was that attempt. we're seeing reports that abbas, the palestinian leader, is now willing to forego his requirement that a settlement freeze exists and be declared by netanyahu openly before any peace talks resume. it seems as though the palestinian stance is softening. but it is not front and center. the president tried to put it there today while at the same time delivering what i think israelis wanted to hear about iran and about syria. >> jamie, andrea brings up a good point, that abbas has, in a sense, reached out and said, okay, we will consider this aspect of things. how key is that to starting any sort of peace talks again? >> well, that has been the block to actual meetings. the palestinians have said until there's a settlement freeze, the position that the united states had taken as well that andrea referred to, until there is such a freeze, then there wo
to spearhead the reforms bat created a coherent syrian opposition council. now you have the secretary kerry, who is deeply involved in that effort as well. we are providing not just advice, but training and capacity in order for that political opposition to maintain links within syria and be able to provide direct services for people inside of syria, including the relief efforts that obviously we are seen here in jordan, but there is a whole bunch of people internally displaced inside of syria who need help. i think that what your question may be suggesting maybe is, why haven't we simply gone in militarily? and you know, i think it is fair to say that the united states often times it finds itself in situations where if it goes in militarily, and if it does not, then people say, why are you doing something militarily? and you know, my response at this stage is to make sure that what we do contribute to bringing an end to the bloodshed as quickly as possible. and working in a multilateral context, an international context, because we think our experience shows when we lead, but we are also w
, weren't supposed to. morsi trying to kill democracy. john kerry, the secretary of state, the week that obama said that the armageddon. congress said 250 million dollars and meanwhile the military which is very disturbing, not just the f-16's, but the tanks. we're not holding them accountable. i think we've got to try-- we've kept the peace with egypt and israel and we've gotten ourselves on the hook. it's not just there, we have the problem in israel, we have the problem now with the saudis in iran and we have the problem-- >> in the region. >> what i'm amazed by, you know, one of the ways that republicans succeeded was they had two pillars, the anti-government spending and national security. and i think the establishment in washington the republican-- okay, but the truth is that they have really let the national security one go. >> sean: all right. what about, i'm a little stunned, liz, i shouldn't be, but the president seems to me has an opportunity to send a loud message to the rise of radical islamists around the world. he's going to snub the knesset, and not going to visit th
type of foreign policy appeasement. and originally whsecretary of state kerry went to egypt, wanted to meet with him and he refused to and it was not covered, you had protests in the united states of america, in egypt for supporting terrorists and the same in the west bank, leslie referred to, they're defacing pictures of president obama, throwing shoes at it and believe that the supposed to be quote, unquote insinuated in cairo have been turned back again. and when you talk about a two-state solution, you have to have a willing peace partner on the other side and not just that there's not really a two-state. you're talking potentially three-state solution because hamas and gaza strip are totally different than fatah and the west bank. >> sean: and leslie, let me ask you a question, why should the israelis, why should they trust barack obama, who snubbed just beyond the pale snubbed bb netanyahu in the white house, that claimed they should go back to '67 border, we promised israel we would never ask them to do that. obama did it and then on top of that, sarkozy says that bb is a lia
presidential election cycles. bush won in 2000, kerry narrowed the margin in 2004. i spent a lot of time there when i was on the presidential campaign in 2004. we saw changes in the rocky mountain west. governor dean intentionally put the convention in denver. we looked at the changing and said there's an opportunity there, because the conservatives in the rocky mountain west are different than the southern conservatives, there are places where we can have common cause and shared values. it also means that as a party we had to show up and make an argument and do the work and actually i think david knows this, a lot of the groups, the grassroots, have been doing the work. there are a lot of things that have to come together for that kind of change to happen. >> let's talk about that. the democrats control the state house and the governorship, david, but if you look at the breakdown, 1.24 million colorado residents are unaffiliated. and then basically it's even, 1.12 million republicans, 1.11 democrats. but you quote the "denver post" publisher dean singleton. he says, this is a republican
of state john kerry has made an unannounced trip to afghanistan. he's meeting today with afghan president hamid karzai. the session came shortly after the u.s. military ceded control of its last detention facility in afghanistan. during secretary or kerry's 24-hour visit, he also plans to talk with civic leaders and others to discuss continued u.s. assistance to the country. egypt has parliamentary elections next month. the ruling party is president mohamed morsi's muslim brotherhood x it's being challenged by more secular groups. next, a group of middle east experts assess the policy in the country and gains by secular groups in parts of egypt. this is an hour and a half. >> personally oversaw the research for this project, and she also twisted my arm into doing this event on the hill so, thank you, dahlia. and also to michelle and summer who really are two of the preeminent egypt watchers and have been really kind to me personally. so i'm going to begin by rolling out the study that was released today as dahlia mentioned. and the top line of that study really is that egypt isn't lost to
thing. it's clear that the administration is -- if you looked at senator kerry's trip, every day on that trip, you saw him in a sense evolving in terms of what we might be doing on syria. i suspect the administration is taking a hard look at and a fresh look at what can be done, and i suspect this trip is going to very much add to that. why don't i pause there. >> very good. thank you. david. >> thank you. everyone. it's good to see everyone. good to be on the panel with my colleagues. i just came back yesterday and i must say i'm -- well, dennis and i have our own cop very generalses. i might be a little less upbeat, having returned from there, and it could be a question of how these things are put forward. but i agree with him definitely on the public piece. i cannot see obama but succeed on the public part of the trip. it really is two trips in one act least to israel. the public part, israel, you'd be hard pressed to find a ford minivan reside full of israel yous who are antiamerican whatever if the differences have been with obama, for the most part, every stop along the vis
visit, along with the visit of the secretary of state kerry, will help us turn a page in our relations with the palestinians. let us sit down at the negotiating table. let us put aside all pre conditions, let us work together to achieve the historic compromise that will end our conflict once and for all. let me conclude, mr. president, on a personal note. i know how valuable the time and the energies of the american president, of yourself. this is the 10th time we've met since you became president and i became prime minister. you've chosen israel as your first venue in your visit, your foreign visit in your second term. i want to thank you for the investment you have made in our relationship and in strengthening the friendship and alliance between our two countries. it is deeply, deeply appreciated. you have come here on the eve of passover. i've always considered it as our most cherished holiday. it celebrates the jewish people's passage from slavery to freedom. through the ages, it has also inspired people struggling for freedom, including the founding fathers of the united states. s
at senator kerry's trip every day on that trip you saw him in a sense evolving in terms what we might be doing on syria. i suspect the administration is taking a hard look at, and a fresh look what can be done. and i suspect this trip is going to very much add to that. why don't i pause there. >> very good, thank you. david. >> thank you everyone. good to see everyone. good to be on the panel with my colleagues. i just came back yesterday. i must say i'm, well, dennis and i often have our own convergences. i might be a little less upbeat having returned from there. it could be a question how these things are put forward but i agree with him definitely on the public piece. i mean i can not see obama but succeed on the public part of the trip because it's really two trips in one at least to israel. the public part, it is israel you would be hard-pressed to find a ford minivan's worth of israelis that who are anti-american. they want to like an american president. whatever their differences have been with obama and they have been recorded in polls, for the most part every stop along the
together? wants to kerry prioritize this among half a dozen issues, and you have a new israeli government that cannot help deal with this issue. i don't think this president wants the next four years a two state solution to expire. that is a strong statement. but that is really true when you think of the pace of settlement activity. that is not a big concern. even if you can do a grand deal , you can preserve the option for a two state solution, that is very important. even though i do not think there is any drama or confrontation between these two leaders now, i think it would be a mistake, because everyone in washington has forgotten about the palestinian issue, and people in the middle east have bigger issues on their own agendas, but somehow this issue would fade out. upsurgehere will be an you will beor digging fresh graves and be left with old problems. each side knows that this issue is not going away. it would be a mistake to put the focus on some sort of immediate confrontation. i don't say that. that these two have worked with the palestinians to find a way out. i made my point
. this isn't just an israel trip but something he could do would be very significant is to empower john kerry, very overwhelmingly secretary of state to work on the peace process now. i still think this is the closing window. >> all right. >> there you go. >> i think dianne feinstein will get a vote on the amendment and i want to see the number of votes. you never what is going to happen in the gun debates. i remember in '98, we republicans were back on our heels and thought we would get absolute slaughtered. boom. we carried the day and won huge and the democrats went into retreat for a decade. i'd be surprised, put some of these restrictions and regulations on the floor. i'd be surprised to republicans. if you want to say background checks to keep the guns in the hands of felons, put that on the record. >> harry reid's reality, i don't know why we are so shocked about this outcome. he telegraphed this a month ago this is where this is going. >> he trying to protect his 12 senate democrats in the cross-hairs. >> good luck to them. if they vote against universal background checks and if they
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)